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Welcome

Celebrating 80 Years Of Service!

The American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy (AAOA) represents over 2,700 Board-certified otolaryngologists and health care providers. Otolaryngology, frequently referred to as Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT), uniquely combines medical and surgical expertise to care for patients with a variety of conditions affecting the ears, nose, and throat, as well as commonly related conditions. AAOA members devote part of their practice to the diagnosis and treatment of allergic disease. The AAOA actively supports its membership through education, research, and advocacy in the care of allergic patients.

"Advance the comprehensive management of allergy and inflammatory disease in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery through training, education, and advocacy."

ADVOCACY UPDATES

Medicare 2022 Conversion Factor Update

Thanks to lobbying efforts from the House of Medicine, Congress took action this month. The…

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CY 2022 Physician Fee Schedule Proposed Rule Summary

On July 13, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released the Medicare Physician…

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Congress Considers Extension of Telehealth Flexibilities Post-Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic forced Congress and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to…

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Changes in MACRA

Macra 101 Image

Before the close of 2017, all physicians must take action to avoid the 4 percent cut that will be assessed in 2019 for not participating in the new Quality Payment Program (QPP) authorized by the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA).  Read More

CMS Announces Changes in MACRA Implementation Timeline. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced major changes to the implementation of the Medicare Access and CHIP Re-authorization (MACRA).
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Upcoming Dates

12/01/22: Research Grant Cycle
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04/01/23: Fellow Exam Application Deadline
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06/01/23: Research Grant Cycle
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06/26/23: Membership Application Deadline to be eligible for AAOA Member rate for the 2023 Basic Course

07/01/23: Scientific Abstract Submission Deadline
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EDUCATION

Although the live portion of the 2022 AAOA Hybrid Annual Meeting is over, all sessions were recorded and are available on-demand until October 31st. Register to watch!

RESIDENTS

For information about Resident opportunities, DosedDaily, research grants, and other resources. Learn More

IFAR

Available Now

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IFAR Impact Factor: 2.454

IFAR Featured Content: COVID-19 - Free Access
Endonasal instrumentation and aerosolization risk in the era of COVID‐19: simulation, literature review, and proposed mitigation strategies . Read More

Changes in Managing Practices

Working together with AAOA staff, volunteer leadership and members will enable us to have a positive impact on our members’ practices.

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Live and Online CME

AAOA Educational Stacks
October 15-December 31, 2022

2022 AAOA Annual Meeting
Loews Philadelphia, PA
Recorded Content Available Until October 31
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Access Whova

2023 AAOA Advanced Course in Allergy & Immunology
March 30 - April 1, 2023
The Hythe Vail
Formerly the Vail Marriott Mountain Resort
Learn More and Register

2023 AAOA Basic Course in Allergy & Immunology
June 29 – July 1, 2023
Hyatt Regency Seattle
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2023 AAOA Annual Meeting
September 28 – September 30, 2023
Embassy Suites by Hilton Nashville Downton

USP 797 Online Module
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News and Updates

Helping Private Practices Navigate Non-Essential Care During COVID-19

The American Medical Association has released updated guidance for private practice physicians navigating the provision…

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Office Hours With AAOA President

As you know, AAOA is about its members and our community. In an effort to…

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College Allergy Symptoms Treatment Back to Shcool

PRACTICE RESOURCES

AAOA Practice Resource Tool Kit

The American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy (AAOA) Practice Resource Tool Kit is intended as a guide to help AAOA members integrate allergy into their otolaryngology practice and to continually improve on this integration as new information, regulations, and resources become available.

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PARTNER RESOURCE CENTER

AAOA has launched a Partner Resource Center to bring you partner resources that can assist your practice and patient care.

Visit the New Center>

PATIENT CORNER

You want me to spray what up my nose? 

Understanding the Different Types of Nasal Sprays

Nasal sprays work well as they are sprayed directly into the nose in order to target nasal allergy symptoms without going to the rest of the body. These can decrease side-effects of the medication and increase results. There are many types of nasal sprays – both prescription and over-the-counter. Here is a quick guide about the different types. Listed are some common generic and brand names, but this is not an inclusive list. Please consult with your physician before starting any medication. All nasal sprays can cause nose bleeds if not used correctly.

Nasal Steroid Sprays

Usually one of the first-line therapies for allergies. Nasal steroids work by decreasing inflammation within the nasal passages. These sprays offer relief from nasal congestion, sneezing, watery eyes and runny nose. Many of these sprays are available over-the-counter. For these medications to work properly, it is important to use them daily or twice daily for a few weeks. Often times people only try them for a week or  do not use them on a regular basis and these medications are unlikely to work. Steroids have many side effects (such as cataracts), but these risks are much lower in the nasal form compared to the oral form, but always discuss with your physician before starting a medication.

Generic- Budesonide, Ciclesonide, Fluticasone, Flunisolide, Mometasone, Triamcinolone

Brand – Rhinocort, Omnaris, Zetonna, Flonase, Nasonex, Nasacort, Xhance, Beconase, Nasarel, Qnasl, Vancenase, Veramyst, Zetonna

Nasal Antihistamine Sprays

Nasal antihistamine sprays are similar to oral antihistamines by blocking histamine. These medications are good at treating the runny nose aspect of allergies. The most common reaction is bitter taste.

Generic – Azelastine, olopatadine

Brand – Astelin, Astepro, Patanase

Combination nasal steroid and antihistamine sprays

This nasal spray contains both a nasal steroid and antihistamine (azelastine and fluticasone). Currently only available by prescription.

Brand – Dymista

Nasal Anticholinergic Sprays

Anticholinergic nasal sprays are good for treating runny nose in patients with both allergic and nonallergic rhinitis. These work by blocking acetylcholine which decreases secretions from the glands in the nasal passage. Common reactions include dry mouth and bad taste.

Generic – Ipratropium Bromide

Brand- Atrovent

Nasal Cromolyn sodium spray

This nasal spray helps with nasal congestion, sneezing and runny nose in patients with allergies. It works by inhibiting mast cells. It is available over-the-counter. The most common side-effect is nasal burning and bad taste. 

Generic – Cromolyn nasal

Brand- Nasalcrom

Nasal Decongestant Sprays

Nasal decongestants provide temporary relief of nasal congestion by constricting the blood vessels in the nose which reduces nasal swelling and congestion. These are available over-the-counter. Nasal decongestants are good for short periods of time such as when you have a cold or during a bad allergy episode. These should not be used for more than three days as they can become addictive by causing a rebound nasal congestion effect. This is called Rhinitis medicamentosa.

Please see the link here for further information on treating chronic nasal decongestant use.

Generic- Oxymetazoline, phenylephrine, xylometazoline, naphazoline, neo-synephrine

Brand- Afrin, Sinex, Dristan, Zicam

Nasal saline spray or gel

These sprays contain saline. The sprays are good to keep the nose moist, but they are unlikely to help with nasal congestion. Often times there are good for patients who have epistaxis.

Generic – nasal saline spray

Brand- Simply Saline, Xlear, A&H, Ayr

Nasal irrigations

Sterile water that is mixed with salt and often baking soda is flushed into the nose. The idea is to rinse out the mucus out of the nose. These are often used before using a nasal spray. Your physician may add steroids or antibiotic ointment to it as well. If used and cleaned proper, these have few side-effects. Water from the tap or well cannot be used as it is not adequately filtered.

Generic – Bulb syringe

Brand- Nettipot, Neimed, Ayr

As always, if you are unsure, please ask your doctor. Also, if you have tried one or more of the above, and you continue to have allergy symptoms, perhaps it’s time to visit your local allergist and discuss other options.

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