Welcome

Celebrating Over 75 Years Of Service

The American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy (AAOA) represents over 2,700 Board-certified otolaryngologists and health care providers. Otolaryngology, frequently referred to as Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT), uniquely combines medical and surgical expertise to care for patients with a variety of conditions affecting the ears, nose, and throat, as well as commonly related conditions. AAOA members devote part of their practice to the diagnosis and treatment of allergic disease. The AAOA actively supports its membership through education, research, and advocacy in the care of allergic patients.

"Advance the comprehensive management of allergy and inflammatory disease in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery through training, education, and advocacy."

ADVOCACY UPDATES

CARES Act and Public Health Emergency Funds Allocation

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced how it plans to allocate the…

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CARES Act Provider Relief Fund Additional Information

AMA Updates on CARES Act Today the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) provided…

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Interim Package and Resuming Non-COVID Care

Sharing the latest on the interim package and the news from CMS about resuming non-COVID…

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Changes in MACRA

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Before the close of 2017, all physicians must take action to avoid the 4 percent cut that will be assessed in 2019 for not participating in the new Quality Payment Program (QPP) authorized by the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA).  Read More

CMS Announces Changes in MACRA Implementation Timeline. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced major changes to the implementation of the Medicare Access and CHIP Re-authorization (MACRA).
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Upcoming Dates

04/15/20: Fellow Exam Application Deadline
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06/01/20: Research Grant Cycle
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06/26/20: Membership Application Deadline to be eligible for AAOA Member rate for the 2020 Basic Course Learn more

07/15/20: Call for Scientific Papers
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09/11/20: Membership Application Deadline to be voted in at the 2020 Annual Meeting and to be eligible for AAOA Member Rate (FREE) for the 2020 Annual Meeting Learn more

12/01/20: Research Grant Cycle
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EDUCATION

New Virtual Course!

Register now as we build out Part 2 Core Allergy & Part 3 Core Rhinology.   Both promise to deliver clinical content you need.  Core Allergy will offer what you need to help refresh or add allergy to your practice — everything from the clinical science to the basics of allergy from a better understanding of testing techniques, vial prep, and dose calculations to other practical implications.  Core Rhinology encompassed the highly sought after rhinology content from our former IAR program.  Part 1 will launch soon with on demand content to help you balance all your time demands.  Part 2 & 3 will feature live-stream content to give you opportunities to interact with the faculty.  Post live session, this content will also be available on demand. Stay tuned for more details as we finish our program build. Read More

IFAR

IFAR Impact Factor: 2.454

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IFAR Featured Content: COVID-19 - Free Access
Endonasal instrumentation and aerosolization risk in the era of COVID‐19: simulation, literature review, and proposed mitigation strategies . Read More

Now Available

Changes in Managing Practices

Mission

Working together with AAOA staff, volunteer leadership and members will enable us to have a positive impact on our members’ practices.

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Live and Online CME

NEW VIRTUAL COURSE! Core Allergy and Rhinology Concepts: Age of Pandemics and Beyond
Learn How to Reboot Your Practice and Freshen Up on Core Allergy and Rhinology Components
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2020 Basic Course in Allergy & Immunology
July 9-11 | Orlando, FL
COVID-19 has made it impossible to convene our 2020 Basic Course. We hope you will consider another AAOA CME opportunity

2020 AAOA Annual Meeting
October 23-25| Scottsdale, AZ
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2020 Advanced Course in Allergy & Immunology
December 9-12 | Vail, CO
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AAOA Clinical Insights
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USP 797 Online Module
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2021 Basic Course in Allergy & Immunology
July 15-17 | Seattle, WA

News and Updates

Resuming SCIT During COVID-19 Pandemic

This summary is intended to provide practicing Otolaryngologists a guide to resuming safe allergy care…

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Small Business Paycheck Protection Program

by Dole Baker, MD, FAAOA, AAOA Socioeconomic Committee Member  Small Business Paycheck Protection Program is…

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College Allergy Symptoms Treatment Back to Shcool

PRACTICE RESOURCES

AAOA Practice Resource Tool Kit

The American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy (AAOA) Practice Resource Tool Kit is intended as a guide to help AAOA members integrate allergy into their otolaryngology practice and to continually improve on this integration as new information, regulations, and resources become available.

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PATIENT CORNER

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Allergy News

Food Guidelines

Changing Policy

Food allergies are a growing health concern with a significant increase in reported prevalence. Allergic reactions to food can produce life-threatening anaphylaxis. Peanut allergy in particular is a significant public health problem with no proven treatment nor a cure at the present time. Peanut allergy often remains a life-long problem for many individuals, as less than 25% of peanut allergic patients are expected to regain tolerance. Current recommendations for management include strict avoidance and a prescription for an auto-injectable form of epinephrine.

The increase in prevalence of peanut allergy occurred during a period of time when there was conflicting guidance regard- ing preventative measures for the development of peanut allergy. Prior to the year 2000, there were no guidelines regarding the timing for the introduction of peanut-containing products nor were there any purposeful strategies to delay the introduction of peanut-containing products to try to prevent the development of allergic disease. But in 2000, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended that “solid foods should not be introduced into the diet of high-risk infants until 6 months of age…and peanuts…until 1 years of age.”

This recommendation was reversed in 2008. At that time, AAP recommended that “the introduction of solid foods not be delayed past 4-6 months of age”. However they did not make any updated recommendations regarding the introduction of peanut-containing products.

The Learning Early About Peanut allergy (LEAP) study demonstrated that peanut-containing products can be safely introduced to high-risk infants between the ages of 4 to 11 months and that there is a monumental potential for peanut allergy prevention. The National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) recently published an addendum guideline regarding the prevention of peanut allergy in the US based on the findings from the LEAP study. [Togias A et al. Addendum guidelines for the prevention of peanut allergy in the United States. J Allergy CliniImmunol.
2017 Jan;139(1):29-44.]

The NIAID-sponsored guidelines include the following three addendum recommendations:

Infants with severe eczema, egg allergy, or both should have introduction of age-appropriate peanut-containing food as early as 4 to 6 months of age to reduce the risk of peanut allergy. The Expert Panel recommended to strongly consider evaluation by in vitro specific IgE testing and/or skin prick testing, and if necessary an oral food challenge. Then based on these results, introduce peanut-containing foods.

Infants with mild-to-moderate eczema should have introduction of age-appropriate peanut-containing food around 6 months of age, in accordance with family preferences and cultural practices, to reduce the risk of peanut allergy. The Expert Panel recommended that infants in this cate- gory may have dietary peanut introduced at home without an in-office evaluation. The Expert Panel recognized that some caregivers and healthcare providers may desire an office supervised feeding and/or evaluation.

Infants without eczema or any food allergy may have age-appropriate peanut-containing food freely introduced in their diet, together with other solid foods, and in accordance with family preferences and cultural practices.
There is an algorithm in the addendum guidelines to aid in assessing the high-risk infants in recommendation one.
For these high-risk infants, it is recommended that they be evaluated and undergo skin testing by a specialist before the introduction of peanut-containing products.

The Expert Panel did recognize that for those high-risk infants who do not have access to a specialist that testing for peanut-specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE) may be the preferred initial approach in certain instances.

The recommendations regarding when to introduce pea- nut-containing products into the diet have changed. New research demonstrated that early introduction of peanut-
containing products around 4 to 6 months of age significantly reduced the risk of development of peanut allergy.

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