Welcome

Celebrating Over 75 Years Of Service

The American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy (AAOA) represents over 2,700 Board-certified otolaryngologists and health care providers. Otolaryngology, frequently referred to as Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT), uniquely combines medical and surgical expertise to care for patients with a variety of conditions affecting the ears, nose, and throat, as well as commonly related conditions. AAOA members devote part of their practice to the diagnosis and treatment of allergic disease. The AAOA actively supports its membership through education, research, and advocacy in the care of allergic patients.

"Dedicated to enhancing knowledge and skill in the care of the allergic patient."

ADVOCACY UPDATES

Health Policy Updates tied to COVID-19

HILL UPDATES Senate Republicans released an updated version of the CARES Act on Sunday, March…

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USP Compounding Standards Update

A letter from the USP Healthcare Quality & Safety from March 12th, 2020 Dear Colleague,…

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USP General Chapter <797> Pharmaceutical Compounding – Sterile Preparations

Latest Updates  on USP <797> On September 23, 2019, the United States Pharmacopeia has announced that,…

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Changes in MACRA

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Before the close of 2017, all physicians must take action to avoid the 4 percent cut that will be assessed in 2019 for not participating in the new Quality Payment Program (QPP) authorized by the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA).  Read More

CMS Announces Changes in MACRA Implementation Timeline. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced major changes to the implementation of the Medicare Access and CHIP Re-authorization (MACRA).
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Upcoming Dates

04/15/20: Fellow Exam Application Deadline
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06/01/20: Research Grant Cycle
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06/26/20: Membership Application Deadline to be eligible for AAOA Member rate for the 2020 Basic Course Learn more

07/15/20: Call for Scientific Papers
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09/11/20: Membership Application Deadline to be voted in at the 2020 Annual Meeting and to be eligible for AAOA Member Rate (FREE) for the 2020 Annual Meeting Learn more

12/01/20: Research Grant Cycle
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EDUCATION

Here is What You Missed...

2019 New Orleans was an outstanding success?  With over 500 participants, our AAOA members left New Orleans re-energized, re-freshed, and re-engaged.  The program offered something for everyone — from cutting edge clinical content to every day how to’s for practice management efficiencies. Read More

IFAR

IFAR Impact Factor: 2.454

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IFAR Featured Content: COVID-19 - Free Access
Endonasal instrumentation and aerosolization risk in the era of COVID‐19: simulation, literature review, and proposed mitigation strategies . Read More

Now Available

Changes in Managing Practices

Mission

Working together with AAOA staff, volunteer leadership and members will enable us to have a positive impact on our members’ practices.

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Live and Online CME

2020 Basic Course in Allergy & Immunology
July 9-11 | Orlando, FL
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2020 AAOA Annual Meeting
October 23-25| Scottsdale, AZ
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2020 Advanced Course in Allergy & Immunology
December 9-12 | Vail, CO
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AAOA Clinical Insights
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NEW!!! USP 797 Online Module
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News and Updates

A Message from the AAOA President, Alpen Patel MD, FAAOA

Dear AAOA Members, We are definitely dealing with unprecedented circumstances on so many levels.  As…

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AAOA COVID-19 Member Alert

First and foremost, we hope you are all safe and healthy. These are not easy…

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College Allergy Symptoms Treatment Back to Shcool

PRACTICE RESOURCES

AAOA Practice Resource Tool Kit

The American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy (AAOA) Practice Resource Tool Kit is intended as a guide to help AAOA members integrate allergy into their otolaryngology practice and to continually improve on this integration as new information, regulations, and resources become available.

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PATIENT CORNER

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What over-the-counter allergy treatment should I try?

You have allergy symptoms, and want to find something to treat your symptoms without having to go to a doctor. The allergy aisle in the pharmacy or big box store is overwhelming. What do all these drugs do?

Let’s break it down.

Antihistamines
These medications block the histamine chemical that is released in the body as a result of allergic reaction. Histamine is what causes itching, runny nose, watery eyes and sneezing. These include the older Benadryl, which is a great medication, however, can be quite sedating. The newer medications, such as Claritin, Zyrtec and Allegra, are also effective with little to no sedation for most people.

Nasal steroid sprays
These have now been released over-the-counter in the forms of Flonase, Flonase sensimist, Nasacort, with others to come soon. They are steroids, which is a potent anti-inflammatory. These medications are very effective at reducing congestion, runny nose and often postnasal drip. They can even help itchy watery eyes. Their worst side effect is drying out the nose, or inciting nosebleeds, which can be reduced by also using nasal saline. If you have early cataracts, or a strong family history of cataracts, you may want to ask your eye doctor about using these long term, as they may increase your risk of developing or worsening cataracts. Also, routine, typically yearly, examination of the inside of the nose is recommended while using these sprays to ensure there are not complications developing.

Decongestants
Pseudoephedrine or phenylephrine are the common OTC decongestant pills. These drugs primary target is congestion, which is reduced by shrinking the swollen tissue in the nose. These medications can cause increases in blood pressure, especially in someone with high blood pressure prior to their use. They also have the potential for tolerance, meaning, if you use them all the time, they become less effective. Phenylephrine and oxymetazoline are topical decongestant nasal sprays which are very effective at reducing congestion in the nose, however, they can cause significant rebound congestion – or much worse stuffy nose – if they are used consistently for more than 3 days in a row. These sprays are best reserved for severe congestion and only for 2-3 days in a row or less.

Guaifenesin or Mucinex
This pill is a mucus thinning medication. It does not treat inflammation or histamine associated with allergies, nor does it treat congestion unless it has a -D at the end. It is only for thick, sticky mucus that is difficult to cough up or blow out.

A good nonmedicated option is nasal saline rinses, via either a squirt bottle or neti pot. These can be very good at eliminating the allergens from the inside of the of your air filter (nose) that have become trapped there, and reduce your need for medication by stopping the chain reaction of allergy before it gets going. They also add moisture to a dry nose and thin secretions, combating some of the side effects of commonly used medications for allergies.

As always, if you are unsure, please ask your doctor. Also, if you have tried one or more of the above, and you continue to have allergy symptoms, perhaps it’s time to visit your local allergist and discuss other options.

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