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Welcome

Celebrating 80 Years Of Service!

The American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy (AAOA) represents over 2,700 Board-certified otolaryngologists and health care providers. Otolaryngology, frequently referred to as Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT), uniquely combines medical and surgical expertise to care for patients with a variety of conditions affecting the ears, nose, and throat, as well as commonly related conditions. AAOA members devote part of their practice to the diagnosis and treatment of allergic disease. The AAOA actively supports its membership through education, research, and advocacy in the care of allergic patients.

"Advance the comprehensive management of allergy and inflammatory disease in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery through training, education, and advocacy."

ADVOCACY UPDATES

What you need to comply with the pending USP General Chapter Pharmaceutical Compounding — Sterile Preparations

3 key compliance criteria While the implementation date of the new USP General Chapter <797>…

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2019 AAOA Advanced Course in Allergy & immunology Optional USP 797 Compliance Workshop

Cost: $125 for AAOA members and $300 for non-members* in addition to AAOA Advanced Course registration…

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NEWS! USP General Chapter Implementation Postponed

The United States Pharmacopeia announced that, due to appeals underway, the previously announced implementation date…

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Changes in MACRA

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Before the close of 2017, all physicians must take action to avoid the 4 percent cut that will be assessed in 2019 for not participating in the new Quality Payment Program (QPP) authorized by the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA).  Read More

CMS Announces Changes in MACRA Implementation Timeline. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced major changes to the implementation of the Medicare Access and CHIP Re-authorization (MACRA).
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Upcoming Dates

03/15/21: 2021 Annual Meeting Crowdsourcing
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03/15/21: Call for Proposals
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04/01/21: Fellow Exam Application Deadline
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06/01/21: Research Grant Cycle
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06/26/21: Membership Application Deadline to be eligible for AAOA Member rate for the 2021 Basic Course

07/15/21: Call for Scientific Papers

09/01/21: Membership Application Deadline to be voted in at the 2021 Annual Meeting

12/01/21: Research Grant Cycle
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EDUCATION

Don't miss the opportunity to curate content you need now conveniently in your own office or home! The content will only be available until March 25th!

NEW YEAR, SAME PANDEMIC

Looking for insights as you focus on 2021 and practice growth? Still struggling with some of the reboot challenges from COVID? AAOA is re-releasing core content from its summer Pandemic course to help give you access to content you need now. Register now for the great way to gain insights, earn up to 13 hrs CME, and help meet your maintenance of certification (MOC) requirements.

JUST THE BASICS

Do you have new staff and need help training them on the core concepts of allergy diagnosis and management in ENT? In your practice reboot, are you reconsidering your practice set up or considering adding allergy to your practice? Are you looking for great review tools for you and your staff?

To help you we are offering time-limited access to our core allergy education library to give you and your staff the tools you need to get up to speed or refresh on the key concepts in allergy diagnosis and management. Register today and earn up to 8.75 hrs of CME (MOC eligible).

IFAR

IFAR Impact Factor: 2.454

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IFAR Featured Content: COVID-19 - Free Access
Endonasal instrumentation and aerosolization risk in the era of COVID‐19: simulation, literature review, and proposed mitigation strategies . Read More

Now Available

Changes in Managing Practices

Working together with AAOA staff, volunteer leadership and members will enable us to have a positive impact on our members’ practices.

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Live and Online CME

New Year, Same Pandemic
January 25-March 25 | On-Demand
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Just the Basics
January 25-March 25 | On-Demand
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2021 Basic Course in Allergy & Immunology
On-demand Mid-June Live Stream Targeted For July 8-11 | Virtual
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USP 797 Online Module
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2021 AAOA Annual Meeting
Pre-launch Mid-September
Live Stream Starting on Oct 16 | Virtual
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News and Updates

Today in ENT Allergy: AAOA’s Podcast. Episode 2 – A Brief Overview of the Otolarygnic Allergy

In the second episode of the AAOA's NEW podcast series Today in ENT Allergy: AAOA's…

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Earn CME Credit in Upcoming Activity Titled: The Role Of Biologics for the Treatment of Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyps

Release Date: August 14, 2020; Expiration Date: August 13, 2021 Nasal polyps impact an estimated…

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College Allergy Symptoms Treatment Back to Shcool

PRACTICE RESOURCES

AAOA Practice Resource Tool Kit

The American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy (AAOA) Practice Resource Tool Kit is intended as a guide to help AAOA members integrate allergy into their otolaryngology practice and to continually improve on this integration as new information, regulations, and resources become available.

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PATIENT CORNER

Do I Need an Antihistamine and an Intranasal Steroid?

By James Connolly, MD, FAAOA

Allergic rhinitis is caused by many different antigens. Some  antigen exposure seasonal (limited exposure during the year such as ragweed or tree pollen), and some antigen exposure is year around or perennial, such as dust mites, cat dander, or mold. Each patient also has different levels of severity of their sensitivity or reactions to each antigen. Both factors can affect symptoms and need for additional therapy.

Allergic reactions are made up of two phases: the acute-phase and the delayed-phase inflammation. The acute phase occurs at the site of exposure when the mast cell degranulates, releasing histamines, and causing itching and swelling at the location of exposure. Poison ivy is a good example of acute phase.  Antihistamines work well to block this phase and decrease acute symptoms.

Intranasal steroids are corticosteroids that block the delayed inflammatory phase, inhibiting release of prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and cytokines. These mediators cause a second wave of symptoms and are delivered from immune cells far away from the local exposure site. The majority of symptoms related to allergy (nasal congestion, runny nose, itchy eyes) are a result of this delayed response. The secondary swelling can occur over days and weeks and plays a larger role in repeat exposures.

For patients having mild non-daily reactions from seasonal allergy, antihistamines alone can be all they need. For those patients suffering from daily symptoms and specifically, perennial allergy exposure, intranasal steroids are the most helpful. If nasal steroids alone are not controlling these symptoms, an antihistamine nasal sprays can provide additional control, but oral antihistamines do not offer any additional benefit. 

For those patients with persistent congestion and swelling or underlying asthma, adding an anti-leukotriene, such as montelukast can also be helpful. 

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