Welcome

Celebrating Over 75 Years Of Service

The American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy (AAOA) represents over 2,700 Board-certified otolaryngologists and health care providers. Otolaryngology, frequently referred to as Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT), uniquely combines medical and surgical expertise to care for patients with a variety of conditions affecting the ears, nose, and throat, as well as commonly related conditions. AAOA members devote part of their practice to the diagnosis and treatment of allergic disease. The AAOA actively supports its membership through education, research, and advocacy in the care of allergic patients.

"Dedicated to enhancing knowledge and skill in the care of the allergic patient."

ADVOCACY UPDATES

AAOA Member Advocacy Update: Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS) 2018

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released the proposed 2018 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS).…

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Changes in MACRA

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Before the close of 2017, all physicians must take action to avoid the 4 percent cut that will be assessed in 2019 for not participating in the new Quality Payment Program (QPP) authorized by the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA).  Read More

CMS Announces Changes in MACRA Implementation Timeline. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced major changes to the implementation of the Medicare Access and CHIP Re-authorization (MACRA).
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Upcoming Dates

12/01/19: Research Grant Cycle
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02/15/20: Crowdsourcing for 2020 Scottsdale
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02/15/20: Call for Proposals
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04/01/20: Fellow Exam Application Deadline
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06/01/20: Research Grant Cycle
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06/26/20: Membership Application Deadline to be eligible for AAOA Member rate for the 2020 Basic Course Learn more

09/11/20: Membership Application Deadline to be voted in at the 2020 Annual Meeting and to be eligible for AAOA Member Rate (FREE) for the 2020 Annual Meeting Learn more

EDUCATION

Here is What You Missed...

2019 New Orleans was an outstanding success?  With over 500 participants, our AAOA members left New Orleans re-energized, re-freshed, and re-engaged.  The program offered something for everyone — from cutting edge clinical content to every day how to’s for practice management efficiencies. Read More

IFAR

IFAR Impact Factor: 2.454

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Now Available

Changes in Managing Practices

Mission

Working together with AAOA staff, volunteer leadership and members will enable us to have a positive impact on our members’ practices.

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Live and Online CME

2020 Basic Course in Allergy & Immunology
July 9-11 | Orlando, FL
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2020 AAOA Annual Meeting
October 23-25| Scottsdale, AZ
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2020 Advanced Course in Allergy & Immunology
December 9-12 | Vail, CO
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AAOA Clinical Insights
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NEW!!! USP 797 Online Module
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PRACTICE RESOURCES

AAOA Practice Resource Tool Kit

The American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy (AAOA) Practice Resource Tool Kit is intended as a guide to help AAOA members integrate allergy into their otolaryngology practice and to continually improve on this integration as new information, regulations, and resources become available.

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PATIENT CORNER

Off to College: Tips for Managing Allergies

Heading to college is an exciting time. What are the best ways for students to avoid exacerbation of their symptoms as they enter the hallowed halls of higher learning?

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College Allergy Symptoms Treatment Back to Shcool

News and Updates

2018 AAOA Basic Course…This is not the same course you may have attended before!

On behalf of the AAOA we would like to extend a personal invitation to join us…

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The AAOA Wins Gold in Association TRENDS 2017 All-Media Contest

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Marina Fassnacht Director of Marketing and Communications 11130 Sunrise Valley Dr.…

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Alert: Nationwide Shortage of Sterile Water for Injections

Nationwide shortage of Sterile Water for Injections is affecting multiple manufacturers. Some Specialty Pharmacies are…

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Healthcare

Future of the Affordable Care Act Up in the Air

On the campaign trail, President Trump said his top healthcare priority would be to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA). His replacement proposals included allowing insurers to sell policies across state lines; making premiums fully tax deductible; expanding the availability of Health Savings Accounts; allowing the importation of drugs from other countries; and capping the employer tax exclusion for health plan coverage. According to a Rand study, Trump’s proposals could cost as much as $41 billion, depending upon which proposals were enacted.

GOP congressional leaders have also set their sights on ACA repeal and replace as a top priority this year, and have already set the process to repeal the bill in motion.  We anticipate they will use a 2015 bill that was passed and subsequently vetoed by former President Obama as a framework. That bill repealed the individual and employer mandates, and ended ACA’s subsidy programs, including premium tax credits, cost-sharing reduction payments and small business tax credits.

GOP leaders relied on a legislative tool to proceed with the repeal, called budget reconciliation, which only requires a simple majority vote in the Senate, to repeal selected provisions of the law. Under this approach, congressional committees have been tasked with writing the repeal legislation, then the full Congress will vote. The final version of the bill, which has not been completed, will most likely postpone the effective date for repeal to allow Congress sufficient time to come up with an alternative to ACA.

On January 18, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released a detailed report laying out the implications of repealing the ACA. The CBO’s report states that repealing the law would result in an estimated 18 million people losing health insurance in 2018, with that number rising to an estimated 32 million by 2026. Repeal—without a comprehensive replacement in place—would also result in health insurance premiums spiking 20-25 percent over the next year, according to CBO.

In the meantime, Senate Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) has called for patience while a replacement plan is developed, and President Trump said he would prefer to keep some major elements of the law—allowing adult children to remain on their parents’ plans until age 26 and prohibiting pre-existing condition exclusions.

However, shortly after being inaugurated, President Trump signed his first executive order which concerned the ACA.  It directs federal agencies “to the maximum extent permitted by law” to relax policies that impose burdens on individuals, insurers, hospitals, doctors and pharmaceutical companies and to give greater flexibility to states.  Because of the complexity of the law, it is difficult to anticipate what changes the agencies will make as a result.

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